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Receiving workers’ comp benefits after a job-related auto injury

On Behalf of | Nov 16, 2021 | Car Accidents |

If you have experienced a motor vehicle injury while driving on the job, you may be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits through your company’s insurance provider. In Louisiana, most businesses must carry this type of insurance coverage.

Workers’ comp benefits may include payment for medical bills, lost wages and more. However, to be eligible for compensation after an auto injury, you may need to prove that the accident occurred during the “course and scope” of your work.

Examples of auto accidents that WC may cover

You may be able to receive workers’ compensation if your injury happened while you were performing your job. In addition to transporting and delivering goods, examples of situations that may qualify under “course and scope of employment” may include performing company errands, transporting coworkers or traveling for work.

Many types of employees may find themselves in a job-related auto accident, including:

  • Traveling salespeople
  • Highway workers
  • Police officers, firefighters and EMTs
  • Traveling nurses or home attendants
  • Consultants

With limitations, workers’ comp is a no-fault system

Under workers’ compensation law, you may be eligible for benefits even if you were at fault or partially at fault for the accident. However, WC may not cover your injury if you were under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time or purposefully caused harm to yourself or others.

Unfortunately, you may face obstacles when filing a workers’ compensation claim, even if your injury occurred while you were on the clock. If you have already received a claim rejection, know that you may be able to receive the compensation you need by appealing the insurer’s denial.

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