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How to document the scene after a car crash

On Behalf of | May 13, 2021 | Car Accidents |

No one anticipates a car crash, so you may not know exactly what to do when you find yourself involved in one. Yet, the steps you take immediately following a Louisiana car wreck may have a serious impact on the outcome of a court case.  

If you or someone else suffers a serious injury in a car wreck, the first thing you should do is seek prompt medical attention. If possible, you or someone else on the scene who did not suffer an injury requiring immediate attention should take steps to document it as thoroughly as possible. What might you want to do when documenting the scene of a crash? 

Snap photos from multiple angles and distances

When documenting the scene of a crash, it is wise to take as many photos as possible. Take photos from multiple distances, starting far away and working your way closer. Take care to document any damage to vehicles when doing so.  

Snap pictures of the surrounding area

Often, environmental factors, such as wet streets or obstructions in the roadway, contribute to crashes. If any factors are present that contributed to your wreck, make sure to document them in photos.  

Snap pictures of any injuries suffered

Be sure, too, to take pictures of any injuries or bruises you or anyone else suffered in the wreck, even if they may not seem severe at the time.  

Keep in mind that while it is easy to delete pictures later, it is impossible to go back and recreate a crash scene exactly as it was. For this reason, it is smart to over-, rather than under-, document a car crash scene.  

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