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Injured? We Can Help Turn Your Luck Around.

How can you receive compensation from an uninsured driver?

| Dec 7, 2020 | Car Accidents |

Most states require every driver to have some form of car insurance. However, this doesn’t mean that everyone in Louisiana is driving legally. Countless drivers are hitting the road without car insurance–and if they hit your vehicle, you might have trouble securing compensation. Here’s how you can seek damages if you’re involved in an accident with an uninsured driver.

How can you seek compensation from an uninsured driver?

Some states have no-fault laws, meaning that you can request compensation after a car accident regardless of who was at fault. If you’re not living in a no-fault state, you’ll have to establish that the other driver was at fault before seeking compensation. This could be done with the help of an attorney.

Once you’ve established fault, you could file a claim with your insurance company if you have uninsured motorist coverage. This coverage allows you to receive a payout if you’re injured in a car accident with an uninsured driver. But if you don’t have this type of coverage, you could also sue the other driver for compensation. Just keep in mind that if a driver doesn’t have car insurance, they probably don’t have many other assets, either.

In some cases, you might also be able to file a claim with your health insurance to help you pay your medical bills. This is usually reserved for severe cases that require extensive medical treatment.

Can an attorney help you seek compensation?

An attorney could help you navigate the complex world of seeking damages after a car crash. Your attorney could help you receive compensation for your injuries even if you’re dealing with an uninsured driver. In some cases, that might mean filing a claim with your insurance company; in others, that might mean launching a lawsuit in court.