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What are red flags in insurance negotiations?

On Behalf of | Aug 19, 2021 | Car Accidents |

While dealing with injuries and damage to your vehicle that you have suffered from a car wreck, you will probably also struggle with receiving compensation. You know that another driver’s negligence is responsible for your accident. Unfortunately, that does not mean the other driver’s insurer is going to make it easy for you to receive coverage.

Getting in a car wreck can be an emotionally trying time for you. Still, you should try to keep a cool head. Do not let an insurance company take advantage of your turmoil as you negotiate for damages. Chron identifies some red flags to watch out for while talking with an insurance company.

A low first offer

Generally, an insurer will make an offer lower than the amount you want. Some insurance companies purposely offer a very low amount to see if you know how much you should actually receive.

Do not think that the insurer is giving you a take it or leave it settlement on the first round. You have the right to counter the offer with one that you think is appropriate. Still, you should also make sure your offer seems reasonable to the insurer.

A release or a waiver

Check any offer for terms that release the insurance company from further liability. If you sign an offer that does so, you cannot pursue any damages you discover in the future. To take an example, you may find that your injuries are more severe than you first thought and you need more compensation for your medical bills.

Look for terminology that says you waive your rights. Also, beware of the words “final payment” or any phrase that sounds like the insurer is providing you with a final offer. Agreeing to a final provision may function just like a waiver in that you are accepting the insurer’s offer and are agreeing not to pursue any further compensation.

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